Bezos’ Law

The future of cloud computing is the availability of more computing power at a much lower cost; Moore’s law thus gives way to Bezos’ law:

Over the history of cloud, a unit of computing power price is reduced by 50% approximately every three years.

 
The cost of cloud computing should naturally track Moore’s law (as the cost of computing is related to the cost of hardware); however, the cost of utilities such as electricity clearly do not follow the same demand curve. Nevertheless, with Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud, Google Compute Engine and Microsoft Azure increasingly competitive on pricing, cloud, as opposed to building or maintaining a data centre, would appear to be a much better economic delivery approach for many companies.

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Alan Turing: mathematician, computer pioneer and code breaker

turingplaque

Found Turing’s plaque today near King’s College, Cambridge (his alma mater).

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Wales Blog Awards 2014

Wales Blog Awards

Computing: The Science of Nearly Everything has been shortlisted for Best Technology Blog in the 2014 Wales Blog Awards, organised by Media Wales and Warwick Emanuel PR. Over 300 entries were received for the competition from across the country this year (after a break in 2013), whittled down to a shortlist of 32 blogs. My blog was also shortlisted back in 2012, so thank you to everyone who has been reading and commenting on my blog for the past three years; if you want a taste of what I have been writing about here, have a look at its first birthday, as well as the best of 2012 and 2013.

All shortlisted blogs are also in the running for the People’s Choice Award, to let the public decide on their favourite blog; the judges will announce the winners of the eleven categories at Chapter Arts Centre in Cardiff on Thursday 15 May.

You can cast your vote here; voting for the People’s Choice Award will close at 5pm on Wednesday 30 April.

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The undersea cables wiring the Earth

US telecoms research firm TeleGeography has published its annual Submarine Cable Map, giving an excellent overview of international connectivity. Over 99% of international communications are delivered by undersea cables; while satellites are used for broadcasting, and are useful for rural communities and very remote places, satellite capacity is limited and expensive.

As you can see below, there is significant connectivity between the major hubs of the world, for both resilience and performance: different paths are used to avoid undersea fault zones, to land in different countries and to avoid certain countries. We have wired the ends of the Earth, almost; what’s left are generally remote island communities. In Europe, the US and Asia, people don’t have to think about what happens if the Internet goes down and they can’t send an important email.

europe-close-submarine-cable-map-2014

Undersea cables are actually more vulnerable than you might think; during the 2011 tsunami in Japan about half of their cables had outages, but the operators were able to reroute capacity to other routes. Last spring, there was damage in Mediterranean cables that linked East Africa to Europe, but it has been many years since there was a complete blackout.

Looking at previous versions of the map (see 2013 and 2012), you can see the developments: in the past year, numerous cables were built to the east coast of Africa, where it was previously all satellite; a new cable linking the US with Mexico and other Latin American countries should be ready this year; another connecting India and Malaysia; with one recently announced connecting the UK and Japan set for the first quarter of 2016.

From a UK backbone perspective, take a look at JANET (which celebrates its 30th birthday today!) and the JANET6 network infrastructure, as well as how it connects into GÉANT, the pan-European research and education network.

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2013 ACM Turing Award: Lesley Lamport

Today, the 2013 ACM Turing Award has been awarded to Leslie Lamport, Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research:

For fundamental contributions to the theory and practice of distributed and concurrent systems, notably the invention of concepts such as causality and logical clocks, safety and liveness, replicated state machines, and sequential consistency.

 
Lamport has not only advanced the reliability and consistency of computing systems that work as intended (for example, temporal logic of actions (TLA) and Byzantine fault tolerance), but also created LaTeX!

Read the full award citation.

lamport

(also see: the 2012 recipients, as well as the full chronological listing of awards)

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Embrace logic

Let him who is not come to logic be plagued with continuous and everlasting filth.

Metalogicon II (1159)
John of Salisbury (1120-1180)

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2014 IET South Wales Annual Lecture

On Thursday 20th March I will be giving the 2014 IET South Wales Annual Lecture at Swansea University:

Computing: Enabling a Digital Wales

Digital technology (and thus computation) is an indispensable and crucial component of our lives, society and environment. In a world increasingly dominated by technology, we now need to be more than just digitally literate. Across science and engineering, computing has moved on from assisting researchers in doing science, to transforming both how science is done and what science is done. In the context of (Welsh and UK) Government science, technology and innovation policy, computer scientists (of all flavours) have a significant role to play. Tom will ground this hypothesis by describing his research interests at the hardware/software interface, his broader work in education and science policy, and then finishing by presenting a vision for a “Digital Wales” underpinned by science and technology innovation.

 
This talk is free, with registration online.

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