Tag Archives: Quotes

Embrace logic

Let him who is not come to logic be plagued with continuous and everlasting filth.

Metalogicon II (1159)
John of Salisbury (1120-1180)

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The authority of reason


To argue with a man who has renounced the use and authority of reason, and whose philosophy consists in holding humanity in contempt, is like administering medicine to the dead, or endeavoring to convert an atheist by scripture.

The American Crisis, No. V (1778)
Thomas Paine (1737-1809)

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The perils of chess


Chess is a mere amusement of a very inferior character, which robs the mind of valuable time that might be devoted to nobler acquirements, while it affords no benefit whatever to the body. Chess has acquired a high reputation as being a means to discipline the mind, but persons engaged in sedentary occupations should never practice this cheerless game; they require out-door exercises — not this sort of mental gladiatorship.


Scientific American, July 1859

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Computing is…

Computing is not about computers anymore. It is about living.

Being Digital (1995)
Nicholas Negroponte

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Science rules of thumb


If an elderly but distinguished scientist says that something is possible he is almost certainly right, but if he says that it is impossible he is very probably wrong.

Arthur C. Clarke

 

When, however, the lay public rallies around an idea that is denounced by distinguished but elderly scientists and supports that idea with great fervor and emotion — the distinguished but elderly scientists are then, after all, probably right.

Isaac Asimov

(reblogged from Futility Closet)

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Garbage in, garbage out

On two occasions I have been asked “Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?“. In one case a member of the Upper, and in the other a member of the Lower, House put this question.

I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question.

Passages from the Life of a Philosopher (1864)
Charles Babbage (1791-1871)

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All scientific knowledge

If, in some cataclysm, all scientific knowledge were to be destroyed, and only one sentence passed on to the next generation of creatures, what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is the atomic hypothesis (or atomic fact, or whatever you wish to call it) that all things are made of atoms — little particles that move around in perpetual motion, attracting each other when they are a little distance apart, but repelling upon being squeezed into one another. In that one sentence you will see an enormous amount of information about the world, if just a little imagination and thinking are applied.

The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Vol. I (1964)
Richard Feynman

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This is not yet a scientific age

Is no one inspired by our present picture of the universe? This value of science remains unsung by singers, you are reduced to hearing not a song or poem, but an evening lecture about it.

This is not yet a scientific age.

What Do You Care What Other People Think? (1988)
Richard Feynman

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Science, the knowledge of consequences

Science is the knowledge of consequences, and dependence of one fact upon another.

Leviathan or The Matter, Forme and Power of a Common Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil
Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679)

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Primes

The problem of distinguishing prime numbers from composite numbers and of resolving the latter into their prime factors is known to be one of the most important and useful in arithmetic. It has engaged the industry and wisdom of ancient and modern geometers to such an extent that it would be superfluous to discuss the problem at length…Further, the dignity of the science itself seems to require that every possible means be explored for the solution of a problem so elegant and so celebrated.

Disquisitiones Arithmeticae (1801)
Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855)

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